PHYLLIS BLISS? 1919

 This iris was found, un-named, in an old iris garden. After growing it for a few years, and discussing with the experts, I believe this iris is probably the lost 'Phyllis Bliss'.

 

PHYLLIS BLISS (1919)

TB-MLa-R1L

sweet lavender x macrantha

I do find irises change…As to the pinks, I was rather staggered by the change in colour of Phyllis Bliss, which I think must be due to the very heavy dressing of lime - it was less rosy pink and more lilac pink this year. You must try her with not too much lime. (AJB)

Graceful in form and outline, with flowers of self pale rosy lavender. Flower spikes very strong and erect growing. One of Mr Bliss's most beautiful and distinctive seedlings. (Wallace 1922)

 

This is a contemporary photo from the Gardeners' Chronicle 1922.

"In the variety Phyllis Bliss, which is one of the choicest of Mr. Bliss's productions, the young flowers open a rather deeper shade than is seen in the fully expanded blooms. The tone is perhaps best described as lavender, overlaid with rose, and there are reticulations of purple. The long, drooping falls are not quite so wide as the standards expanded blooms. The tone is perhaps best described as lavender, overlaid with rose, and there are reticulations of purple. Long drooping falls not quite as wide as Standards". (Gardeners Chronicle 1919)

To turn to others of different shades, the absolutely unique Phyllis Bliss appeals before them all. There was nothing like it in the entire collection. it is unique, whether in the exceeding length of the falls or the great size and upstanding character of the standards; the twain responsible for flowers of exceptional size. It is virtually a self, and I am en-debted to my daughter - we have to go to the ladies at times for our information - for the suggestion that the colour is 'orchid mauve'.

 (The Garden: E H Jenkins 1919)